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Classics

Classical Civilisation means the study of classical Greek and Roman culture. The “Classical Age” is normally defined as being from the period from about 500 B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. Classical Civilisation offers a wide choice of topics in the areas of archaeology, art, history, literature, politics and society. The topics cover many aspects of classical civilisation which have been significant in the development of the modern world.

At RGS, students can opt to take Classical Civilization at GCSE where students will be introduced to aspects of Greek and Roman culture such as the ancient Olympic Games and the birth of theatre. They also study texts written in different literary styles and genres such as tragedy and epic poetry.

As well as being exciting and inspiring, Classical Civilisation will help you develop analytical skills and intellectual flexibility which will be useful in a wide range of jobs or in further study. Classicists are characterised by their intellectual curiosity, their ability to consider an idea from an alternative cultural viewpoint and their ability to synthesise a wide range of information and ideas. Employers recognise that studying Classical Civilisation is a sound qualification for any work requiring an analytical and logical mind, such as politics, law, computing and management.

Course Offerings

Course Title Qualifications Obtainable Awarding Body
Key Stage 4 Courses
Classical Civilisation GCSE AQA

 

Year 9
Curriculum Content: Classical Civilisation means the study of classical Greek and Roman culture. The “Classical Age” is normally defined as being from the period from about 500 B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. Classical Civilisation offers a wide choice of topics in the areas of archaeology, art, history, literature, politics and society. The topics cover many aspects of classical civilisation which have been significant in the development of the modern world.

At RGS, students can opt to take Classical Civilization at GCSE and at A Level. At GCSE, students will be introduced to aspects of Greek and Roman culture such as the ancient Olympic Games and the birth of theatre. They also study texts written in different literary styles and genres such as tragedy and epic poetry. At A Level students develop their understanding by exploring connections between texts of similar style and genre, as well as gaining a more in depth understanding of Greek and Roman culture; this contextual knowledge is used to develop deeper and more sophisticated responses to the texts studied.

As well as being exciting and inspiring, Classical Civilisation will help you develop analytical skills and intellectual flexibility which will be useful in a wide range of jobs or in further study. Classicists are characterised by their intellectual curiosity, their ability to consider an idea from an alternative cultural viewpoint and their ability to synthesise a wide range of information and ideas. Employers recognise that studying Classical Civilisation is a sound qualification for any work requiring an analytical and logical mind, such as politics, law, computing and management.

Year 10
Curriculum Content: Year 10 sees the second year of the three year GCSE course of Classical Civilisation, in which students begin to examine the city states of Athens and Sparta. Students will be invited to compare the forms of government and social structures in these cities and evaluate whether they would have liked to have lived in a society like this.

Students will complete one controlled assessment in Year 10, which will focus on Ovid’s Metamorphosis.

Year 11
Curriculum Content: Year 11 sees the third and final year of the GCSE in Classical Civilisation.

We aim to have completed the course by the end of Year 10. Students will spend Year 11 revising each of the examination units.

At the end of the course, students sit three written papers. Each paper will be 1 hour long, and count for 25% of the overall grade.

The examinations students will take are:

  • Unit 1: Stories and Histories (Topic C Athens and Sparta)
  • Unit 2: Drama and Life (Topic A Greek Tragedy and Drama Festivals)

Unit 3: Conflict and Carnage (Topic C The Ancient Olympic Games and the Panathenaia)