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English

Curriculum Intent:

‘Inspiring literature helps us to understand the world, and understanding language helps us to unlock great literature.’

 English is offered as:

  • Core subject Years 7, 8, 9, 10 &11
  • IB Literature Year 12 & 13 (Standard and Higher)
  • IB Language and Literature Year 12 & 13 (Standard only)

 

Key Stage 3 English

Curriculum Overview

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 7 Modern Drama: ‘Our Day Out’ by Willy Russell Modern Novel: ‘Refugee Boy’

By Benjamin Zephaniah

Introduction to non-fiction:

Conventions of non-fiction forms; Travel Writing; Newspapers; Speeches

Poetry: Poems about place to tie in with the cross curricular Perspectives of London project. Drama:

Introduction to Shakespeare.

Myths and Legends.
Year 8 Modern Drama: ‘Pygmalion’ by George Bernard Shaw Drama: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’ by William Shakespeare Prose:  Gothic Literature.  Extracts from various Gothic texts. Poetry:  Love Poetry across the ages. Non-fiction and debating: The power of Spoken language Prose: The novel project.

 

Year 9 Drama:  ‘Macbeth’ by William Shakespeare.

What makes a tragic hero?

Poetry:  Poems from Different Cultures

How can poetry reflect society?

Modern Novel: ‘A View from the Bridge’ by Arthur Miller

What constitutes an outsider?

Modern Prose: ‘Anita and Me’ by Meera Syal

How can storytelling empower you?

 

Prose:  19th Century Literature

How does context shape authorial intent?

Descriptive and Narrative writing

What makes a great story?

 

Year 7

Students receive 7 lessons a fortnight through which they will develop the key skills of communication through the written and spoken word.  They will learn how to analyse the form, structure and language of a text whilst also looking at the conventions of different genres.  For Drama this will include: stage directions, characterisation, context and language; for Prose: Characterisation, Themes and Narrative Structure and for Poetry: Interpretation, form and structure and terminology.  Students will also study a range of non-fiction texts where they will study the different conventions of different forms of non-fiction.  Key skills will be developed through working both independently and in groups and will consist of both written and oral work including role play and presentations.

Year 8

Students receive 7 lessons a fortnight through which they will continue to develop and add to the skills learnt in Year 7.  For Drama they will develop their knowledge of how context can affect the content and ideas within a text, and consider how characterisation affects the audience’s response.  They will also further their understanding of narrative structure looking at how a plot is developed.  In their Prose studies, students will develop their analytical skills by focusing on close analysis; how to unpack a quotation and looking at what key words and phrases suggest and authorial intent.  They will also consider the importance of setting within a text and the effect on both the text and audience.  For Poetry, students begin to develop their skills of comparison and how to analyse similarities and differences within two poems.   For their non-fiction studies, students will engage in the skills of debating looking at how to argue and persuade using both the written and spoken word. Again these skills will be developed through working both independently and in groups, and will consist of both written and oral work including role play and presentations.

Year 9

Students receive 7 lessons a fortnight, exploring a ‘big question’ which provides a focus for the unit and the opportunity for personal enquiry.  It also allows students to consider the universality of these ideas and how they are represented in different genres across time.  Students will develop their independent thinking skills and will encouraged to share their ideas and consider the ideas of others. Students will continue to develop their analytical and creative skills through both written and oral work as in Years 7 and 8.

Throughout KS3, students are exposed to high quality texts which embrace our literary heritage and the canon.

Assessment

English studies comprise both written and oral skills and alongside the school assessment guidelines, assessment will be made of both these skills throughout KS3.   There are 2 formal assessments a term which will be followed by whole class feedback lessons.  Frequent constructive verbal feedback will also be given to pupils throughout lessons from the teacher and through peer assessment.  Regular high level questioning will also be used to assess students’ understanding.

Further Reading/Resources

– Students are encouraged to read as often and as much as possible.  In both Years 7 and 8 students have one lesson a fortnight which is dedicated to reading for pleasure.  Students bring in their own books for this lesson and to help them with this, a KS3 reading list of recommended texts is available here  (I will need to add a link here).

– Students will be taken to the Globe Theatre for a tour and a workshop where they will develop their understanding of performing Shakespeare.

 

Key Stage 4 English  

Curriculum Overview

Students at Key Stage 4 have 7 periods a fortnight studying the AQA GCSE English Language and English Literature qualifications.

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 10 Modern Literature: ‘An Inspector Calls’ by J.B. Priestley (Literature Paper 2 AQA Poetry Anthology.

 

(Literature Paper 2)

Unseen Fiction Extracts from the 20th and 21st centuries.

(Language Paper 1)

AQA Poetry Anthology and Unseen Poetry

(Literature Paper 2)

Non-fiction texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

(Language Paper 2)

Descriptive and Narrative Writing  and Writing for specified audiences and purpose.

(Language Papers 1&2)

Year 11 ‘Romeo and Juliet’ by William Shakespeare

(Literature Paper 1)

‘Romeo and Juliet’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens

(Literature Paper 1)

‘A Christmas Carol’

 

(Literature Paper 1)

Revision Revision  

 

 

Year 10 

Students begin their studies for their GCSE English Literature and GCSE English Language.  In Year 10 the Literature focus is on Literature Paper 2 ‘Modern Texts and Poetry’.  Students will also cover all the necessary elements for success in both Language Paper 1 ‘Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing’ and Language Paper 2 ‘Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives’.  In addition, at some point in the year students will be assessed for the Spoken Language component of the English Language qualification.  Students will give a presentation on a subject of their choice for which they will be awarded either a Distinction, Merit of Pass.  Whilst this is a compulsory element of the GCSE English Language qualification, the grade awarded does not go towards the overall grade for this qualification.

Year 11

The focus in Year 11 is GCSE English Literature Paper 1 ‘Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel’.   There are only 2 texts for this paper and students will study ‘Romeo and Juliet’ for a term and a half and then ‘A Christmas Carol’ for a term and a half.   From September in Year 11 students will complete a ‘Revision Note Programme’ where they will complete a schedule of revision tasks as part of their home learning.  They will then build on this during Terms 4 and 5 which are dedicated to revision.

Assessment at GCSE

GCSE English Language Paper 1: ‘Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing’  (1 hr 45 mins. 50% of qualification)

GCSE English Language Paper 2: ‘Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives’.   (1 hr 45 mins.  50% of qualification)

Spoken Language Award (compulsory unit but 0% of qualification)

GCSE English Literature Paper 1: ‘Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel’  (I hr 30 mins.  40% of qualification)

GCSE English Literature Paper 2: ‘Modern Texts and Poetry’ (2 hrs 15 mins. 60% of qualification)

Further Reading/Resources

– BBC Bitesize. Revision resources for both GCSE English Language and Literature https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize

– Revision guides for exams and texts e.g. York Notes and CGP

– Seneca online for revision practice https://senecalearning.com/en-GB/

– The Royal Shakespeare Company Learning Zone https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare-learning-zone/

– A KS4 reading list is available to encourage students to continue to read for pleasure.

 

Key Stage 5

Students at Key Stage 5 can follow one of 2 paths as part of the IB Diploma:  IB Literature or IB Language and Literature.  IB Literature is available at both Higher and Standard level and IB Language and Literature at Standard Level only.  All students must take one English course to complete their Diploma.

Curriculum Overview IB Literature

IB Literature Standard Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 12 ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ by Tenessee Williams ‘A Doll’s House’ by Henrick Ibsen ‘Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair’ by Pablo Neruda and ‘Springtime in a Broken Mirror’ by Mario Benedetti ‘Why We Can’t Wait’ by Martin Luther King and Paper 1 conventions of non-fiction ‘Othello’ by William Shakespeare ‘The World’s WIfe’ by Carol Ann Duffy
Year 13  ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Margaret Attwood IA planning practice and skills. ‘Top Girls’ by Caryl Churchill Revision for Paper 1 and Paper 2 Revision for Paper 1 and Paper 2

 

IB Literature Higher Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 12 ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ by Tenessee Williams  and ‘A Doll’s House’ by Henrick Ibsen Poetry of Sylivia  Plath and Pablo Neruda  and ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Maragaret Atwood ‘Why We Can’t Wait’ by Martin Luther King and Paper 1 conventions of non-fiction and ‘Madam Bovary’ by Gustave Flaubert ‘Othello’ by William Shakespeare   and ‘Springtime in a Broken Mirror’ by Mario Benedetti ‘The World’s Wife’ by Carol Ann Duffy and Paper 1 conventions of prose and drama IA planning practice and skills.
Year 13 Half of  Yellow Sun’ by  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

and ‘To Each His Own’ by Leonardo Sciascia.

HL essay ‘Top Girls’ by Caryl Churchill Revision for Paper 1 and Paper 2 Revision for Paper 1 and Paper 2

 

Year 12

In Year 12 students studying the IB Literature pathway will have an opportunity to explore a wide range of texts that span both time and space.   Students will study texts from four centuries,  four continents and eight countries.  At Higher level thirteen texts are studied while at Standard nine texts will be studied.  At KS5 students continue to hone and develop the analytical skills they have practiced at GCSE as well as learning about the impact of structure. To study from an IB perspective students will also explore the ways in which meanings arise from the time and place a text was written in; they will explore the relationships between writers and readers and will examine the connections between literary texts.

 Year 13

In Year 13 of the Literature course students will have an opportunity to understand further how the texts they are studying can be used for assessments in the course. Students will learn how to write cohesive and coherent arguments.  They will learn the skills for redrafting. The Internal Assessment is an oral assessment and students will explore the differences between written and oral responses to texts.  In preparation for their written exams students will explore further the conventions of literary texts and how to write about unseen texts.

Assessment at IB Literature

Standard Level

External assessment:     Paper 1: Guided Literary analysis (1 hrs 15 mins) (35% of total assessment)

The paper consists of two passages from two different literary forms, each accompanied by a question.  Students choose one passage and write an analysis of it.

Paper 2: Comparative essay (1 hr 45 mins) (35% of total assessment)

The paper consists of four general questions.  In response to one question, students write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course.

Internal assessment:     Individual oral (15 mins) (30% of total assessment)

Supported by two extracts, students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes to a prompt, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher.  This is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Higher Level

External assessment:     Paper 1: Guided Literary analysis (2 hrs 15 mins) (35% of total assessment)

The paper consists of two passages from two different literary forms, each accompanied by a question.  Students write an analysis of each of the passages.

Paper 2: Comparative essay (1 hr 45 mins) (25% of total assessment)

The paper consists of four general questions.  In response to one question, students write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course.

Higher Level Essay  (20% of total assessment): Students submit an essay on one literary text or work studied during the course.  The essay must be 1,200-1,500 words in length.

Internal assessment:     Individual oral (15 mins) (20% of total assessment)

Supported by two extracts, students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes to a prompt, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher.  This is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Curriculum Overview IB Language and Literature 

IB Language and Literature Standard Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 12 ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ by Tennessee Williams Non-literary texts on the topic of film and television Non-literary texts for the topic of politics ‘Top Girls’ by Caryl Churchill Non-literary texts for the topic of war ‘The World’s Wife’ by Carol Ann Duffy
Year 13 ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Margaret Attwood. ‘A Doll’s House’ by Henrik Ibsen IA practice.

 

Revision for Paper 2

Revision for Paper 1 and Paper 2

 

Year 12

In Year 12 students studying the IB Language and Literature pathway will have an opportunity to explore a wide range of both literary and non-literary texts and their relationships with one another.  Literary and non-literary texts will be grouped by concepts to help students understand the intricate and integral relationships between types of texts.    Students will study 5 literary texts including at least one play, novel and collection of poetry.  They will also explore an extensive range of non-literary texts.  At KS5 students continue to hone and develop the analytical skills they have practiced at GCSE as well as learning about the impact of structure. To study from an IB perspective students will also examine the ways in which meanings arise from the time and place a text was written in; they will explore the relationships between writers and readers and will examine the connections between texts; both literary and non-literary.

Year 13

In Year 13 of the Language and Literature course students will have an opportunity to further understand how the texts they are studying can be used for assessments in the course. Students will learn how to write cohesive and coherent arguments.  The Internal Assessment is an oral assessment and students will explore the differences between written and oral responses to texts.  In preparation for their written exams students will explore further the conventions of non-literary texts and how to write about unseen texts.

Assessment at IB Language and Literature

External assessment:     Paper 1: Guided Literary analysis (1 hrs 15 mins) (35% of total assessment)

The paper consists of two passages from two different non-literary forms, each accompanied by a question.  Students choose one passage and write an analysis of it.

Paper 2: Comparative essay (1 hr 45 mins) (35% of total assessment)

The paper consists of four general questions.  In response to one question, students write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course.

Internal assessment:     Individual oral (15 mins) (30% of total assessment)

Supported by two extracts, one literary and one non-literary students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes to a prompt, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher.  This is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Further Reading/Resources 

– Wide reading of literature from across time and cultures.

– Wide reading of a range of non-literary texts including non-fiction texts, broadsheet newspapers, journals screenplays and biographies.

– The Royal Shakespeare Company Learning Zone https://www.rsc.org.uk/shakespeare-learning-zone/

– Visits to the theatre to see dramas in action

– A KS5 reading list is available to encourage students to continue to read for pleasure.

 

British Values:

British Values in English

Democracy: Abuses of democracy are taught in KS5 through the dystopian text ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. Ideas of democracy and abuse are further explored by students through research of how context affects the ideas presented in literature and through the speeches of Martin Luther King.

Rule of law: This is explored in KS3 through ‘Macbeth’ when students examine the divine right of Kings and also throughout their studies looking at how the rule of law has affected women’s rights throughout history. This is also part of the study looking at the political elements in ‘Othello’ in KS5.

Individual Liberty: The rights of women are considered throughout all key stages. Students study ‘Myths and Legends in Year 7, ‘Pygmalion’ in Year 8, and through the study of 19th century literature throughout. KS5 has a strong focus on gender issues through the study of texts such as ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’, ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’, ‘A Doll’s House’ and ‘Madame Bovary’ and poetry by Carol Ann Duffy. Students also study the speeches of Martin Luther King looking at the Civil Rights Movement.

Mutual respect: Respect for other cultures is developed in Year 7 through the study of ‘Refugee Boy’. This is further explored in Year 9 through poetry from different cultures and texts such as ‘A View from the Bridge’ and ‘Anita and Me’. Respect for different classes is also studied in Year 7 in ‘Our Day Out’ and further explored through socialist ideas with the GCSE study of ‘An Inspector Calls’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’. Cultural differences are also explored through the study of ‘Othello’ in KS5.

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs: Tolerance of other faiths is examined in KS3 through ‘Anita and Me whilst the ideas of fundamentalism are explored through the study of ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ in KS5.