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Sixth form student in the Independent Learning Centre

Information Communication Technology

A high-quality ICT education equips pupils to understand and change the world through computational thinking, and provides a sense of empowerment and excitement in developing and using digital technology.

ICT includes these interrelated elements:

  • Digital Literacy is the ability to access, use, and express oneself using digital technology, including a critical understanding of technology’s impact on the individual and society. E-Safety is covered here extensively.
  • Information Technology covers the purposeful creation and application of digital systems to develop products and solutions.ICT has great economic and societal value. ICT provides pupils with the knowledge and skills to contribute to the digital economy, and play an active role in a world where new technologies are invented daily. ICT has the potential to make the world a better place, and understanding ICT is the key to realising that opportunity.
  • Students will also cover Computing modules during their ICT curriculum. Computing is deeply concerned with how computers and computer systems work, and how they are designed and programmed. Pupils studying computing gain insight into computational systems of all kinds, whether or not they include computers. Computational thinking influences fields such as biology, chemistry, linguistics, psychology, economics and statistics.
  • We provide an ICT curriculum that is fit for the 21st century. ICT at RGS is both a stimulating yet challenging subject. ICT is a natural tool to be utilised to enhance and enrich learning and teaching, and to improve and develop communication within and beyond the school. Students in Key Stage 3 and 4 are encouraged to develop their ICT capability to the full.

Computing and ICT at The Rochester Grammar School is a fantastic way to develop specific skills and become aware of technology that is constantly being developed. A majority of careers use a computer at some point and skills you learn in Computing and ICT can be transferred to any future career you wish to pursue. Computing & ICT is a very practical subject allowing you to use skills you have learnt and put them in to practice. Through studying Computing and ICT you are able to gain confidence in using a number of different programmes and become confident in your own ability. ICT is a subject that can interest anyone due to the variety of tasks you undertake. Technology will become more and more important to you as will continue to affect day-to-day life in every possible way.
Olivia – KS5

Course Offerings

Course Title Qualifications Obtainable Awarding Body
Key Stage 4 Courses
Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Creative iMedia OCR
Key Stage 5 Courses
BTEC Level 3 Pearson
Year 7
Curriculum Content: Computing Curriculum Content:

In Year 7 Computing students study 6 topics which lay the foundations of the skills that are required to carry out various investigation projects.

Using computers safely, effectively and responsibly – E-Safety Project: Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

Spreadsheet Modelling – Excel Project: Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems.

Scratch Programming – PacMan project: Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems. Students will learn to become computational thinkers and how to use pseudocode, algorithms, loops and IF statements to help create their own version of PacMan.

Python Introduction – Python: Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures; design and develop modular programs that use procedures and functions. Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

HTML & CSS Web Design – Perspective of London Project: Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.

Database Development – Access project: Construct and populate a database with data, validation and data types. Use database software to solve real world problems.

Year 8
Curriculum Content: Computing Curriculum Content:

In Year 8 Computing students study 6 topics which lay the foundations of the skills that are required to carry out various investigation projects.

Using computers safely, effectively and responsibly – E-Safety Project: Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.

HTML & CSS Web Design – Create a Country Project: Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems. Understand the programming language of web pages and how to formulate your own website through web development.

Advanced Python Programming – Python: Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures; design and develop modular programs that use procedures and functions. Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

Understanding Computers – Under the hood project: Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems. Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds, and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits; be able to convert between binary and decimal, and perform simple binary arithmetic.

Games Programming – BYOB: Design, use, and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems. Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures such as lists, tables or arrays; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions. Understand simple Boolean logic (such as AND, OR and NOT), and some of its uses in circuits and programming.

Database – Access Project: Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.

Advanced Java Programming – Java: Use two or more programming languages, one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures; design and develop modular programs that use procedures and functions. Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem.

Year 9
Curriculum Content: Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia are media sector-focused, including film, television, web development, gaming and animation, and have IT at their heart. They provide knowledge in a number of key areas in this field from pre-production skills to digital animation and have a motivating, hands-on approach to both teaching and learning. Cambridge Nationals deliver skills across the whole range of learning styles and abilities, effectively engaging and inspiring all students to achieve great things.

The OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Creative iMedia (120 glh) consists of four units (two mandatory and two optional)

Assessment is by one written examination and three centred assessed units.

Students will complete the R082 and R085 units in their first year of the course.

R082: Creating digital graphics – Centre assessed tasks OCR moderated Approx 30 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS) Mandatory

R085: Creating a multipage website – Centre assessed tasks OCR moderated Approx 30 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS) Optional Unit

 
Year 10
Curriculum Content: R081: Pre-production skills – Written paper OCR set and marked 1 hour 15 mins – 60 marks (60 UMS) Mandatory

R086: Creating a digital animation – Centre assessed tasks OCR moderated Approx 30 hours – 60 marks (60 UMS) Optional Unit

 
Year 11
Curriculum Content: Computer Science Assessment Outline:

Unit: Computer Systems

Computer systems – 80 marks theory paper. 40% of total GCSE

Topics covered include:

  • System Architecture
  • Memory
  • Storage
  • Wired and wireless networks
  • Network topologies, protocols and layers
  • System security
  • System software
  • Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns

Unit: Computational thinking, algorithms and programming

Computational thinking, algorithms and programming – 80 marks theory paper. 40% of total GCSE

Topics covered include:

  • Algorithms
  • Programming techniques
  • Producing robust programs
  • Computational logic
  • Translators and facilities of languages
  • Data representation

Unit: Programming Project

Programming Project – 40 marks non exam. 20% of total GCSE

Topics covered include:

  • Programming techniques
  • Analysis
  • Design
  • Development
  • Testing and evaluation and conclusions
 
Year 12
Curriculum Content: The aims of the course are to encourage students to:

  • the capacity to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically;
  • the skills to work collaboratively;
  • the ability to apply skills, knowledge and understanding of ICT in a range of contexts to solve problems;
  • an understanding of the consequences of using ICT on individuals, organisations and society and of social, legal, ethical and other considerations on the use of ICT;
  • an awareness of emerging technologies and an appreciation of the potential impact these may have on individuals, organisations and society.

Course Breakdown:

Title Size and structure Summary purpose
Pearson BTEC Level 3

National Extended

Certificate in

Information Technology

 

Ø  360 GLH (475 TQT)

Ø  Equivalent in size to one A Level.

Ø  4 units of which 3 are mandatory and 2 are external.

Ø  Mandatory content (83%).

Ø  External assessment (58%).

 

This qualification is designed for learners who are interested in an introduction to the study of creating IT systems to manage and share information, alongside other fields of study, with a view to progressing to a wide range of higher education courses, not necessarily in IT.
 
Year 13
Curriculum Content: Students will complete each of the following three modules as part of the course as their mandatory units:

 

Unit 1: Information Technology Systems

 

  • Written examination set and marked by Pearson.
  • 90 marks.
  • Two hours.
  • Digital Devices in IT systems
  • Transmitting data
  • Operating online
  • Protecting data and information
  • Impact of IT systems
  • IT issues

 

Unit 2: Creating Systems to Manage Information

 

  • A task set and marked by Pearson and completed under supervised conditions.
  • The supervised assessment period is ten hours arranged over a number of sessions in a 1 week assessment period timetabled by Pearson.
  • Completed using a computer and submitted electronically.
  • 66 marks.
  • The purpose and structure of relational database management systems
  • Standard methods and techniques to design relational database solutions
  • Creating a relation database structure
  • Evaluating a database development project

Unit 3: Using Social Media in Business

Learners explore how businesses use social media to promote their products and services. Learners also implement social media activities in a business to meet requirements

Explore the impact of social media on the ways in which businesses promote their products and services

Develop a plan to use social media in a business to meet requirements

  • Implement the use of social media in a business

Students will complete ONE of the following two optional modules as part of the course:

Unit 5: Data Modelling

  • Learners study how data modelling can be used to solve problems. They will design and implement a data model to meet client requirements.
  • Investigate data modelling and how it can be used in the decision-making process
  • Design a data model to meet client requirements
  • Develop a data model to meet client requirements

Unit 6: Website Development

  • Learners investigate website development principles. They will design and develop a website using scripting languages.
  • Understand the principles of website development
  • Design a website to meet client requirements
  • Develop a website to meet client requirements