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Student during a PE lesson

Physical Education

Curriculum Intent:

To be physically educated is to strive for excellence in physical literacy, movement and healthy wellbeing.

Physical Education develops students’ physical competence and confidence and their ability to use skill learnt in a range of different activities. It promotes physical skilfulness, physical development and a knowledge of the body in action.

Physical Education provides opportunities for students to be creative, competitive and face a variety of different challenges as individuals as well as in groups and teams. It promotes positive attitudes towards active and healthy lifestyles.

Students learn how to think in different ways to suit a wide variety of creative, competitive and challenging activities. They learn how to plan, perform and evaluate actions, ideas and performances to improve their quality and effectiveness. Through this process students discover their aptitudes, abilities and preferences and make informed choices about how to get involved in lifelong physical activity.

Extra Curricular

Rochester Grammar School has a wealth of talented students who excel across a range of extra-curricular sports and activities with the school offering a dedicated extra-curricular programme to support and progress these students.

The school currently offers clubs which compete in local competitions such as; netball, football, futsal, indoor and outdoor athletics. Due to the high number of eager students at the school, we can offer A and B teams throughout the U13-U16 age groups, these teams compete locally in the Medway League as well as attending the annual district and county netball tournament. The football and futsal teams have been successful in recent years, competing in both the Kent School Football & Futsal Cup as well as the English Schools FA Cup. The athletics team have been district winners for nine years and have recently found success in the Kent School Games Indoor Athletics competitions. Whilst we do not offer a swimming club, the school has also seen great success attending local swimming galas with our swim team.

In addition to the clubs that can lead to competition, the school also offers clubs for students to participate in for fun and further develop the skills they have learnt in their PE Lessons. These include rugby, handball, gymnastics/dance, tennis trampolining and rounders.

The school has several community club links where external coaches come into school free of charge –  these include Holcombe Hockey Club, Olympia Boxing and Medway RFC. Many students involved in our extra-curricular provision have also gone on to represent Medway District at football, Kent Netball and Kent Athletics to name a few.

Students also have the opportunity to attend elite sporting fixtures, some examples of these include being part of a record-breaking crowd at Wembley Stadium watching England Lionesses against Germany and witnessing London Pulse at the Copperbox Arena in the Vitality Netball League.

Physical Education is offered as:

  • Core subject – Years 7-11
  • GCSE Physical Education – Year 10-11
  • IB Sports, Health and Exercise Science – Year 12-13

Key Stage 3 Physical Education

Curriculum overview:

An example of of the curriculum studied at Key Stage Three can be found below

  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 7 Netball Gymnastics Football Dance Athletics Rounders
Year 8 Hockey Badminton Gymnastics Netball Athletics OAA
Year 9 Basketball Netball Gymnastics Badminton Athletics Tennis

Year 7 

In year 7 students study a wide variety of both competitive and non-competitive activities. These include a range of games from netball, hockey, tag rugby and football to rounders and tennis in the summer term. Students are also taught individual disciplines including gymnastics, dance and athletics.

Year 8

In Year 8 students continue to study a variety of both competitive and non-competitive activities, developing on the skills learnt in the wide range of games and individual activities taught in Year 7. In year 8 pupils also take part in outdoor adventurous activities (OAA), this includes orienteering, team building, and problem-solving tasks.

Year 9

In year 9 students continue to study the range of both competitive and non-competitive activities they have experience in years 7 and 8. This allows them to further enhance their skill level and depth of knowledge of each sporting activity which will serve them well in life after school.

Throughout year 7 to 9 students can participate in Inter-House sport competitions which promotes both competition and teamwork. This also allows pupils the chance to compete with and against their peers to gain house points for their Houses. Students participate in sports such as; netball, football, cross country and rounders.

Assessment:

Physical Education is a practical subject and alongside the school assessment guidelines assessment will be made of the students’ performances as we move through the academic terms.  Frequent, constructive verbal feedback will be given to the students throughout lessons from the teacher and through peer assessment.  In addition to the students will be expected to display their knowledge and understanding in reflective discussions with the teacher and fellow peers.

Further Reading/Resources

– GCSE PE Bitesize – Rules, skills and general information regarding the sports that we cover.

– Women in Sport – 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win – Rachel Ignotofsky

– Fever Pitch – Nick Hornby

– Seabiscuit – Laura Hillenbrand

– The Boys of Summer – Roger Kahn

– Touching the Void – Joe Simpson

 

Key Stage 4 Core PE

Curriculum Overview 

An example of of the curriculum studied at Key Stage Four can be found below

  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 10 Netball HRF Basketball Badminton Athletics Tennis
Year 11 HRF Badminton Trampolining Netball Basketball

Year 10 and 11

In year 10 and 11 all students continue to participate in Core PE. In addition to the activities studied in previous years these students will experience Health Related Fitness (HRF) and tennis during the summer term. HRF provides students with a knowledge and understanding of healthy, active lifestyles. Students will plan and carry out exercise programmes utilising a range of training methods and develop their knowledge of how to lead a healthy, active lifestyle. Through Sport Education topics, students will also can explore other roles in sport such as leading and organisation.

Assessment

Physical Education is a practical subject and, alongside the school assessment guidelines, informal assessments will be made of the pupils’ performance and skills progression as we move through the year. Frequent constructive verbal feedback will be given to pupils throughout lessons from the teacher and through peer assessment.

Further Reading/Resources

– The Sports Gene – David Epstein

– The Edge – Roger Pielke

– Eat, Sweat, Play – Anna Kessel

– The Lionesses Roar Trilogy

– They Don’t Teach This – Eniola Aluko

– My Story – Kelly Smith

 

Key Stage 4 GCSE Physical Education.

Curriculum Overview:

  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 10 Netball. Trampolining & Climbing. Athletics & Swimming.
Health, Fitness and Well-being/Physical Training. Socio-cultural Issues/Using Data. NEA – Coursework
Year 11 Badminton. Movement Analysis. REVISION.
Anatomy and Physiology. Sports Psychology. REVISION.

*NB: Please note that Climbing is offered as an additional practical area that is a chargeable activity.  Swimming is offered as an afterschool activity during terms 5 & 6 in Year 10

Year 10 and 11

The GCSE Physical Education (AQA) option offers students the opportunity to follow both the practical element (40%) and the theory of PE (60%). This course gives students an insight into health and fitness, the factors affecting sporting performance and the social and cultural factors affecting participation through sport and PE. Theoretical topics that students will study include:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Movement Analysis
  • Physical Training
  • Sport Psychology
  • Socio-cultural Issues
  • Health, Fitness and Well-being
  • Using Data

Due to the practical nature of the course, pupils who wish to study this subject must have very good Physical Education grades from KS3. Additionally, they must also currently compete at a high, school level or compete outside of school in fixtures and/or competitions in a sport offered as part of the AQA course.

In lesson time we offer a range of sports for assessment at GCSE level – sports such as netball, trampolining, gymnastics, handball and athletics.  We also provide the opportunity for students to participate in rock climbing and swimming as part of the course.  If the student competes regularly outside of school in a sport that is on the AQA specification that we cannot facilitate in school such as equestrian – then we will arrange an ‘Assessment Only’ package with that student.

Link: http://web.aqa.org.uk/qual/newgcses/science/new/phy_edu_overview.php?id=03&prev=03

Assessment at GCSE:

The GCSE is split into 60% examination and 40% practical/coursework.

The examination is as follows (60%).

Examination Paper 1: The human body and movement in physical activity and sport. Paper 2: Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport.
What’s assessed · Applied anatomy and physiology

· Movement analysis

· Physical training

· Use of data

·  Sports psychology

·  Socio-cultural influences

·  Health, fitness and well-being

·  Use of data

How it is assessed · Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes

· 30% of GCSE

·  Written exam: 1 hour 15 minutes

·  30% of GCSE

Question format · Mixture of multiple choice/objective test questions, short answer questions and extended answer questions. · Mixture of multiple choice/objective test questions, short answer questions and extended answer questions.

Non-exam assessment: Practical performance in physical activity and sport (40%).

What’s assessed:

· Practical performance in three different physical activities in the role of player/performer (one in a team activity, one in an individual activity and a third in either a team or in an individual activity).

· Analysis and evaluation of performance to bring about improvement in one activity.

How it is assessed:

· Assessed by teachers

· Moderated by AQA

· 40% of GCSE

Questions:

· For each of their three activities, students will be assessed in skills in progressive drills and in the full context.

· Students will be assessed on their analysis and evaluation of performance to bring about improvement in one activity. 

Further Reading/Resources

– The Sports Gene – David Epstein

– The Edge – Roger Pielke

– Eat, Sweat, Play – Anna Kessel

– The Lionesses Roar Trilogy

– They Don’t Teach This – Eniola Aluko

– My Story – Kelly Smith

– GCSE Physical Education AQA Revision Guide

– Physical Education Complete Revision and Practice Pack

– Revise AQA: Physical Education Revision Pack

– Physical Education AQA Exam Practice Workbook

– GCSE Physical Education Complete Practice and Revision Guide

– GCSE Physical Education AQA Revision Question Cards

 

Key Stage 5 Physical Education

Curriculum Overview

The International Baccalaureate course in Sports, Exercise and Health Science (IB SEHS) is offered at standard and higher level (SL & HL) at Rochester Grammar School.

  Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Year 12 Skills in Sport Option Block B Anatomy
Exercise Physiology Measurement and Evaluation of Human Performance Option Block A
Year 13 IA Coursework REVISION REVISION
  Energy Systems Movement Analysis REVISION

 Year 12 and 13

The IB SEHS involves the study of the science that underpins physical performance. The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition. Students cover a range of topics and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This provides an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyse human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimensions and ethics by considering sport, exercise and health relative to the individual in a global context. The table below outlines the topics studied, and assessments at both standard and higher level:

Standard Level Higher Level
The students will be taught the following aspects:

1. Anatomy – The skeletal system and the muscular system.

2. Exercise Physiology – Structure and function of the ventilator system and the structure and function of the cardiovascular system.

3. Energy Systems – Nutrition, Carbohydrate and fat metabolism and nutrition and energy systems.

4. Movement Analysis – Neuromuscular function, joint and movement types and the fundamentals of biomechanics.

5. Skills in Sport – The characteristics and classification of skill, information processing and the principles of skill learning.

6. Measurement and evaluation of human performance – Statistical analysis, study design, components of fitness and the principles of training programme design.

There are four options.  Students are required to study any two options:

A. Optimising physiological performance.

B. Psychology of sports.

C. Physical activity and health.

D. Nutrition for sports, exercise and health.

*Currently The Rochester Grammar School offer Option A and B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The students will be taught the following aspects:

1. Anatomy – The skeletal system and the muscular system.

2. Exercise Physiology – Structure and function of the ventilator system and the structure and function of the cardiovascular system.

3. Energy Systems – Nutrition, Carbohydrate and fat metabolism and nutrition and energy systems.

4. Movement Analysis – Neuromuscular function, joint and movement types and the fundamentals of biomechanics.

5. Skills in Sport – The characteristics and classification of skill, information processing and the principles of skill learning.

6. Measurement and evaluation of human performance – Statistical analysis, study design, components of fitness and the principles of training programme design.

7. Further anatomy.

8. The endocrine system.

9. Fatigue.

10. Friction and drag.

11. Skill acquisition and analysis.

12. Genetics and athlete performance.

13. Exercise and immunity.

There are four options.  Students are required to study any two options:

A. Optimising physiological performance.

B. Psychology of sports.

C. Physical activity and health.

D. Nutrition for sports, exercise and health.

*Currently The Rochester Grammar School offer Option A and B

Assessment at IB

The Sports, Exercise and Health Science course is assessed in two ways.  There is the IA component which is 20% of the final mark and there are 3 examinations:

Standard Level

Paper 1: 75 minutes 20%: 30 multiple-choice questions.

Paper 2: 1.25 hours 35%: One data-based question and several short answers. One of three extended response questions.

Paper 3: 1 hour 25%: Several short-answer questions in each of the two options studied.

Higher Level

Paper 1: 1 hour 20%: 40 multiple-choice questions.

Paper 2: 2.15 hours 35%: Section A: one data-based question and several short-answer questions on the core and AHL topics.

                                        Section B: two extended-response questions on the core and AHL (from a choice of four)

Paper 3:  1.15 hours 25%: Several short-answer and extended-response questions in each of the two options studied.

Further Reading/Resources

– Can We Have Our Balls Back Please? How the British Invented Sport – Julia Norridge

– A Great Face for Radio: The Adventures of a Sports Commentator – John Anderson

– Beware of the Dogs: Rugby Hard Man Reveals All – Brian Moore

– The Complete Guide to Sports Nutrition – Anita Bean

– The Anatomy of Sports Injuries – Brad Walker

– Among the Thugs – Mike Brearley

– Inside Sports Psychology – Costas Karageorghis & Peter Terry

 

British Values:

British Values in Physical Education

Democracy: Extra-Curricular is open to all pupils of all abilities. It is free of charge.

Individual Liberty: Girls are encouraged to express their abilities across a full range of sports and access competitions regardless of practical ability.

Rule of Law: PE fixtures, Sports Day, Inter-house, A2 Specification, AQA and IB SHES specifications: The use of performance enhancing drugs in sport and the effects of the body, AQA GCSE: Deviance in Sport, which covers aggression and hooliganism., Practical rules for safe practice.

Mutual Respect: Fair play within lessons, Fair play when playing and competing against other schools in league and cup competitions, Peer observations in lessons whereby pupils give constructive criticism to one another in order to understand and improve performance.

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs: In lessons, pupils of faith are allowed to wear their religious bands and headscarf’s in line with their beliefs.  In all lessons across all Key Stages, students are encouraged to express their views through performance and discussion both in practical and theory lessons.